L.A. Mid Century Dream Home

MCM Crush:  This eye-popping 1961 gem built by architect David Hyun, located in Los Angeles.  

“Mustard yellows, greens and oranges set the tone, and each additional pop of color matches perfectly. Every piece in the house is secondhand — nearly all bought at Southern California flea markets and swap meets. Vintage magazines rest on the tables and abstract-shaped mirrors adorn the walls. An old record player sits in the lounge next to dice-shaped ottomans and sunken chairs. Lava lamps, geometric shapes, and Hollywood memorabilia are constant surprises around each corner. It’s a bright one story “L” shaped home, with a pool glistening right outside the floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors. A cabana is quietly tucked away in the corner, large-leafed green plants grow high and cast shadows. Roy Orbison, Chuck Berry, and The Mamas and Papas ring loud through the home’s speaker system. This house is rare, stylish…. Inspiring.” – http://blog.freepeople.com/2015/06/peek-vintage-dream-home/?crlt.pid=camp.Yl1We48SpuW0

Photos by Melodi Meadows

The Definitive Mid-Century Modern Populuxe Film

“The definitive populuxe film. This Jam Handy produced, Chevrolet sponsored technicolor movie, was designed to get the American public ready for the 1959 Chevy Impala. Just a decade earlier, car companies were producing one model, and you kept it as long as you could. Now, there were options, and colors, and and you wanted the new model every year. Some may call this propaganda. Hell, it was made by Chevrolet, did you NOT think there would be cars in it. GM’s agenda in no way detracts from the mid-century magic in this film. This is straight up vintage eye porn. If you’re into atomic age design and mid-century minimalism, then this is your Citizen Kane.” – ZarakPhoto

Retro Futurism ~ Vintage Futuristic Toy Cars

One of our fave vintage collectibles is futuristic toys from the 1950′s and 60′s. These were mostly produced in tin and imported from Japan. This was during the “Atomic Age” when design and pop culture were obsessed with all things “Space” related and looking into the future. And while these toys may fall into the kitsch category, that is why we love them – their naivety combined with that super cool 50′s Atomic design is irresistible!

Vintage Ford Gyron Toy

The Ford Gyron was a tin battery-operated car made in Japan in the early 60’s. It was based on the futuristic two-wheeled gyrocar first shown to the world in 1961 at the Detroit Motor Show as a concept car designed by futurist Syd Mead. The car could run forward and reverse while a red light in the rear blinked on and off. A switch underneath the car raised and lowered the roof.

XP-1960 Dream Car

The “XP-1960 Dream Car” was produced by Mattel in 1953. According to the Mattel catalog of 1953, the car was available in four futuristic colors of Red Blaze, Chartreuse Dreamliner, Black Diamond, and Blue Bullet. It was described as “The only car of its kind in the world of toys. Low slung, impact resistant plastic body. Permanent, high gloss chrome trim. BOMBER BUBBLE transparent convertible top. SPEED STREAK friction motor. 4 futuristic colors. Individually packed in eye catching 3 color box.”

1959 "Future Car"

You can see the beginnings of a 1961 Thunberbird underneath all the “futurism” going on! This 1959 Meiko “Future Car” certainly had the fins for space travel!

Lincoln Futura Toy Car

This rare tin friction car was based on the popular concept car designed by the Lincoln division of Ford Motor Company. It was originally designed by Ford Motor Company lead stylists Bill Schmidt and John Najjar Ferzely and built by Ghia entirely by hand in Turin, Italy, at a cost of $250,000 (2014 equivalent: $2,200,000) and displayed on the auto show circuit in 1955. In 1966 the car was modified by George Barris into the Batmobile, for the 1966 TV series Batman.

Enjoy this recent video of a toy Futura offered at auction:

Look for a future article here on Modern Bear on vintage Robots and other Space Age toys…

Retro Futurism: 60’s Motorola Ad

1960s Motorola Ad

Some fabulous examples of Retro Futurism are the series of illustrations by Charles Schridde for a Motorola advertising campaign during the 1960’s. These ads often appeared in Life Magazine and featured futuristic architecture and fantastical lifestyles centered around Motorola TV and stereo consoles.

“When Charlie Schridde was working at New Center Studios in Detroit in the early sixties, the recently acquired Motorola account was the subject of an in-house contest. Each artist was asked to create a scene involving “a neat place to watch tv.” As a result, Schridde’s vision of sophisticated couples, near-future architecture and sumptuous, panoramic environments won the day. He continued creating the high-profile, double-page spread Motorola ads (which regularily appeared in both Life magazine and the Saturday Evening Post) even after leaving New Center.”
– Today’s Inspiration
http://todaysinspiration.blogspot.com/2008/11/charles-schridde-old-friend-harry.html